Archives for Via Sacra

Walking on Water with Madeleine L’Engle

it’s been many years since I first came across the work of the late great Madeleine L’Engle, author of the beloved A Wrinkle in Time. Back when I was a member of a much-missed Mythopoeic reading group, we read L’Engle’s Walking on Water: Reflections on Faith and Art.  The intersection of faith, spirituality, and literature is one of the subjects closest to my heart—how to incorporate spirituality in your writing, and how not to at any cost. With that in view, I’d like to share a couple of quotes from the early portion of this wonderful book, with the recommendation
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Tomberg on Myth and Archetype as Analogy in Time

p. 13 – 16 Meditations on the Tarot Early in his great work, Meditations on the Tarot, Valentin Tomberg proposes that the interconnectedness and interelatedness of all things is fundamental to any form of Knowledge. Without it, we could not move from the Known to the Unknown. The first “method” of acquiring Knowledge, in Tomberg’s view, is that of Analogy. As the Emerald Table of Hermes Trismegistus so famously puts it, That which is above is like to that which is below and that which is below is like to that which is above, to accomplish the miracles of (the)
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The Martha and Mary of Parenting

by Debra and Daniel Murphy [This article was first published in the United States in the early ‘90’s by the Daughters of St. Paul in their Family magazine, then reprinted in the April 1994 (vol. 15, NO. 3) issue of the British journal, The Sower: the Journal for Religious Educators in School and Parish] — — — What is largely missing in today’s parenting is the biblical ‘better (or best) part” that Jesus pointed out to Martha (see Luke 10:38-42). Choosing the better part We parents are entrusted with the physical, intellectual, psychological and spiritual growth and development of our children, who are
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Walls and Ramps on the Way to Chartres

Commentator David Brooks recently gave a speech to a gathering of Christian philanthropists. A significant portion of the thoughtful talk was about the longing of non-religious people for the transcendent, about Christian interaction with others in the Public Square, and how the attitudes and actions of Christians can help or hinder that quest for the transcendent. My favorite passage: Everyone’s on a walk to Chartres. On a walk toward something transcendent, even if they don’t know what it is. Are you building ramps on the way to Chartres or are you building walls? It’s a wonderful speech. But if seemed to me,
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